Great Britain

Ex-Chancellors Philip Hammond & Ken Clarke heading for House of Lords despite repeated Brexit blocking

TWO former chancellors booted out of the Tories by Boris Johnson will be offered plush seats in the House of Lords, despite repeatedly trying to block Brexit.

Ken Clarke and Philip Hammond are both on Downing Street's list for peerages in a move sure to spark anger among Brexiteers.

Remainers Mr Hammond and Mr Clarke both had the Conservative whip withdrawn last year for attempting to block a no-deal Brexit over and over again - but Boris Johnson will still nominate them for peerages, according to the BBC.

The official process for nominating and vetting new peers is not finished, but the two anti-Brexit former MPs are both understood to be on the list of nominations.

The former chancellors sided with rebel Remainers in Parliament over crucial Brexit votes last year.

Their votes effectively killed the Brexit bill last year, by voting against a timetable to rush it through Parliament.

The pair were part of a group of Tory MPs who ended the country's hope of exiting the EU on October 31 last year.

A handful of rebel MPs were offered a place back in the Conservative party before the election, but neither Mr Hammond or Mr Clarke were given the hand of friendship.

After 50 years as an MP Mr Clarke quit politics rather than run as an independent MP.

Pro-Brexit MP Iain Duncan Smith told The Times: "Brexiteers will raise an eyebrow" at the nominations, because Hammond "played such a prominent role in frustrating Brexit"

Former chancellors are by convention usually offered a peerage after they have stepped down as MPs.

But the PM is not playing by parliamentary norms, after refusing to give former Speaker John Bercow a peerage - the first time in 230 years a Speaker has not been elevated. 

Former Scottish Conservative leader Ruth Davidson is also expected to be one of Downing Street's picks for peerages.

Boris has also backed two former Labour MPs Ian Austin and John Woodcock to sit as non-aligned peers in the House of Lords.

Both were vocally critical of Jeremy Corbyn, and quit the Labour party to campaign against him during the election.

The House of Lords Appointments Commission and Number 10 did not comment on the Dissolution Honours List.

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