Ultimately, it was too fast and furious for England.

Gareth Southgate’s men were made to look pedestrian in a game played at 100 miles-an-hour when Scotland’s passion shone through while England could not find their extra class and pedigree.

The boos at one end and wild celebrations at the other told its own story at Wembley because Scotland’s brave hearts produced a terrific performance and gutsy point to keep their Euro hopes well and truly alive.

In contrast, England’s optimism and hope after their opening win in Group D will not be anywhere near as high after they were made to look decidedly average on a rain-soaked night of frustration.

And perhaps the biggest worry for Southgate will be the form - or lack of it - of Harry Kane who has bailed out England on so many occasions with a late winner or dramatic goal.

For the second game running, Kane looked leggy, off the pace and was substituted, this time after 74 minutes when he just ran out of ideas.

England were desperately poor at Wembley
England were desperately poor at Wembley

Kane was not alone in that but the England captain is supposed to be Southgate’s biggest goal threat, the striker who can win the Golden Boot and yet has not looked remotely like scoring in either game.

England wilted in the atmosphere, crumbled under the pressure while Scotland embraced it and the 3,000 visiting fans - there seemed so many more as they made such a noise - revelled in a night that will live long on their memories.

Scotland had the best chances, produced the best individual displays with Kieran Tierney outstanding and Billy Gilmour tigerish in midfield, the Chelsea youngster bullying more experienced opponents in the height of the battle.

England can still win Group D by beating Czech Republic on Tuesday and then this will be forgotten in Southgate’s minds but rivalries do not work like that for fans.

Scotland’s Tartan Army enjoyed a glorious night, enjoyed spoiling England’s party and the home fans grew more frustrated and fed-up as the game were on.

It was a disjointed England performance, they tried to slow the game down to allow their extra quality and skilful players run the game and set the tempo.

But, in reality, that just played into Scotland’s hands as Steve Clarke’s men were tenacious, hard working and produced a performance of grit and never-say-die spirit.

It was a strange contrast of England looking slow in a frenetic blood and thunder contest and, at the final whistle, the Scotland players and Clarke celebrated with their fans.

Scotland's players were delighted with their result
Scotland's players were delighted with their result

Scotland needed to dig deep after losing their opening game and they did exactly that. England were so controlled against Croatia but now all the old questions about big match know-how will come back.

Maybe even the turning point came after just 12 minutes because England missed the biggest chance of the night, were made to regret and they were left to pay a heavy price.

Mason Mount’s corner found John Stones in acres of space, unmarked and alone in the Scotland box, rising above the defence and yet he crashed his free header against the post. It was a glorious chance and an incredible let-off all at the same time.

For all the re-runs of Euro 96 and showreels of previous meetings, we tend to forget how well Scotland played the last time the old rivals met in a major tournament 25 years ago.

But no-one remembers those hard luck stories, just the glory and Scotland were determined not to be undone again.

Jack Grealish was unable to make an impact
Jack Grealish was unable to make an impact

England went off at half time to a smattering of boos as frustration gripped the home support and hope spurred on the Tartan Army.

This was England’s youngest ever team in a major tournament, with an average age of 25 years and 31 days, and maybe that showed. The occasion had got to them.

Scotland went desperately close on the half hour mark with their best chance of the night as England keeper Jordan Pickford produced a fabulous save to deny Stephen O’Donnell and Che Adams headed the rebound wide.

England tried to exert their authority on the second half, Southgate gave in to the fans’ chants and brought on Jack Grealish but even his trickery just ended up going down blind alleys.

It was a night to remember for Scotland and one to forget for England and the mood suddenly feels very different for both.