The UK formally left the European Union on January 31 and now the transition period has begun.

During this 11-month period, Britain will keep following all of the EU’s rules and things will mostly stay the same.

After a year of negotiations, the UK will officially leave the EU on December 31, 2020.

The government has released information to help those wondering how driving in the EU will be different when negotiations are complete and Brexit is completed.

There is still plenty to be agreed upon, and starting next year, there will be some new rules for driving in the EU to take note of.

This guide tells you everything you need to know about driving in the EU after Brexit
This guide tells you everything you need to know about driving in the EU after Brexit

This guide tells you everything you need to know about driving in the EU after Brexit.

Driving in the EU: what you need to know

In many countries around the world – depending on where you are or how long you are staying – you need an international driving permit (IDP) in order to drive.

Before Brexit, an IDP was not required to drive in EU countries and during the transition period, UK licences are still valid so you are not required to get one.

Will your UK license be valid in the EU after Brexit?
Will your UK license be valid in the EU after Brexit?

However, what happens after December 31 2020 depends on the negotiations between Boris Johnson’s government and the EU.

The UK will have different arrangements with every country and what you will need depends on where you are visiting.

Some countries will require an IDP, especially for longer visits, which can be bought for £5.50 at Post Offices.

You may also need to carry your UK driving licence and some countries have stricter rules if you only have a paper licence.

There are two types of IDP you may need when travelling to Europe, known as the 1949 and 1968 IDPs.

The 1949 permit covers any visits to Cyprus and Andorra and longer trips to Ireland, Spain, Iceland and Malta.

The 1968 permit covers driving in all other countries that require IDPs, plus Norway and Switzerland.

France, Italy and Cyprus are the only countries that require an IDP for short visits, whereas the majority of countries – including Germany and Spain – only need you to have one once you have been driving in the country for a set period – three, six or 12 months.

If you are a UK licence-holder living in another EU country, you might have to exchange your UK licence for one issued by an EU country.

In some countries, you may need to take another driving test if you wait to do this until after the transition period ends.

Of course, all this depends on the outcome of negotiations between the UK and the EU over the next 11 months.