Mayor Andy Burnham has called on the government to extend furlough schemes - or risk the 'disintegration' of businesses such as Manchester Airport.

Speaking on Sky News this morning, the Greater Manchester mayor said millions of people across the country will have woken up very worried for their jobs ahead of an imminent announcement on new restrictions.

It comes as Manchester Airport earlier this month closed Terminal Two as passenger numbers were recorded at around 25,000 - down from 115,000 last year - and boss Charlie Cornish slammed 'government inaction', quarantine restrictions and a lack of financial support for hurting the country's aviation industry.

Mr Burnham said: "What I would say is the announcement of a curfew needs to be accompanied by by a clear financial package which will also help individuals who may be today worried about losing their jobs."

Greater Manchester Mayor Andy Burnham

He added: "More broadly as we go into autumn we can't turn off the taps on furlough in October. A massive employer in Manchester, Manchester Airport, can't return to normal any time soon and we can't just see an airport like that kind of disintegrate because people are made redundant.

"What we need to see is the continuation of furlough."

Get the latest updates from across Greater Manchester direct to your inbox with the free MEN newsletter

You can sign up very simply by following the instructions here

Speaking as the total number of cases rose to 4,368 in 24 hours and Covid-related deaths were recorded as 41,788, Mr Burnham also called on the Government to consult consistently with the regions - and invite more regional voices to the COBRA meetings, one of which is to be held today (Tuesday).

He said: "If he (Boris Johnson) listens more to people at a regional level we would build a greater sense of national unity in facing this virus going into the rest of autumn and the winter."

Referring to he government's commitment to give financial support for people on low pay who need to self-isolate, he said northern leaders had been calling for this throughout, adding: "They do listen but these things would be done better if we did it in Cobra so we could work out these things more quickly. I and others could relay some of the things coming back from here."

Giving last week's 'chaotic testing' as an example, he said a 'direct in' to the Government would have allowed faster reporting of the problems.

He added: "It's their decision at the end of the day, I've tried to be constructive through this and I'll continue to do that going forward."

But he said communications with the regions had been 'ad hoc' and they have to be 'properly plugged in to the Government's thinking' as we head towards a difficult winter.

He said the government was trying to strike the right balance and do the right thing but that they needed to follow that up with the necessary support.

He said more effort was needed to bolster contact tracing - and that COBRA was the place for this to be addressed. He said more voices from the regions at these meetings would create a 'greater sense of national unity', adding: "This winter is going to really test us in very severe ways and let's face it together."