Great Britain

Coronavirus UK news LIVE – Pfizer to test vaccine on CHILDREN aged between five to 11

BRITS have been warned not to "wreck this now" as England's deputy chief medical officer urged everyone to continue following the rules.

Professor Jonathan Van-Tam said there were "some worrying signs that people are relaxing" in the coronavirus battle at "exactly the wrong time".

He also alerted people who have already been vaccinated to the dangers of "taking their foot off the brake" and being tempted to break Covid-19 rules.

He told a Downing Street briefing on Friday: "All the patients that I vaccinate... I say to them, 'Remember, all the rules still apply to you and all of us until we're in a much safer place'. It doesn't change because you've had your first dose of vaccine.

"And so, please don't be tempted to think, 'Well, one home visit might be all right now the weather is getting better, going to be a nice weekend, one small gathering in your house won't really matter'.

"So my key message tonight is look, this is all going very well but there are some worrying signs that people are relaxing, taking their foot off the brake at exactly the wrong time."

Follow our coronavirus live blog below for the very latest news and updates on the pandemic...

  • EXPLAINER - WHAT IS THE VACCINE PASSPORT?

    An online petition was started urging the government not to introduce vaccine passports.

    The petition says the passports could be "used to restrict the rights of people who have refused a Covid-19 vaccine".

    It claims the passports would be “unacceptable” because vaccination is not mandatory.

    Prime Minister Boris Johnson announced a review of vaccine certificates or passports.

  • DOING IT FOR THE KIDS

    Pfizer is to start testing its Covid vaccine on children as young as five.

    The pharmaceutical company's boss said it has already finished enrolling volunteers aged 12 to 15 and is now looking at younger subjects.

    It will begin trials on kids aged five to 11 soon, with data available by the end of 2021.

  • COVID VACCINE ROLLOUT BY AGE ‘MAKES SENSE’, FORMER GOVERNMENT ADVISER SAYS

    The move to continue the rollout of the coronavirus vaccine by age rather than prioritising frontline professions “makes sense”, a former Government scientific adviser has said.

    Professor Sir Mark Walport, former chief scientific adviser to the Government, said the strategy maximised the number of vaccines on a basis of the most vulnerable.

    Sir Mark told BBC Breakfast on Saturday: “The rollout is going in such an efficient way by doing it through the ages.

    “Of course, there will be many teachers, many police, who are in the 40-50 age group and indeed who will have been immunised already. So, it does make sense.

    “It’s still the case that most of the vulnerability, including in those professions which mix with a lot of people, is still with the older members of those cohorts, and so this is a strategy that maximises the number of vaccines and does it on a basis of the most vulnerable.”

  • HANNAH INGRAM-MOORE’S EUOLOGY TO CAPTAIN SIR TOM MOORE

    Captain Sir Tom Moore’s daughter Hannah Ingram-Moore said in her eulogy: “We had the happiness of a stable family life, peppered with the excitement of intrepid camping trips across Europe which gave our young minds a window on the world that you said was our oyster to open.”

    She described her father moving in with them after her mother’s death as “the most amazing, multi-generational life journey, thriving on the wealth of knowledge and the knowledge we in turn gave to you”.

    Ms Ingram-Moore added: “Your relationship with (your grandchildren) was a constant remember of how lucky we were to have you as a father and of that special bond we have.”

    She continued: “We know, because you told everyone who would listen, that you relished this next phase of your life.

    “We respected your values, your independence and your space, and you did the same for us, we felt your love and we know you felt our love for you.”

  • CAPTAIN SIR TOM MOORE'S FUNERAL: A HERO'S FAREWELL

    Captain Sir Tom Moore's daughter today fought back tears at his funeral and said: "Daddy, you may be gone but your spirit lives on".

    The NHS fundraising hero received his own guard of honour and a spectacular RAF flypast as he was laid to rest this afternoon.

    And his family have paid heartbreaking tributes to the grandad who became known as a "beacon of life and hope for the world" during the pandemic.

    Six soldiers from the veteran's regiment carried his coffin - draped in a Union Jack flag - into Bedford crematorium for a family service Captain Tom planned himself.

    Both of the hero's daughters spoke at the service, while his grandchildren read touching poems in honour of their grandfather.

  • SUMMER OF FREEDOM COULD BE BROUGHT TO END BY FOURTH WAVE

    Summer freedoms may be capped once again by a fourth Covid wave, scientists fear.

    The roadmap out of lockdown has given hope for a world without restrictions by June 21 at the earliest - with even the return of packed nightclubs.

    Read more here.

  • CAPTAIN TOM’S FUNERAL SERVICE DREW TO A CLOSE WITH SINATRA’S ‘MY WAY’

    The celebrant leading Captain Sir Tom Moore's funeral thanked the family for their “hard work” in making a special funeral.

    The funeral plays out with Frank Sinatra’s My Way.

  • WORLD BECAME 'ENTHRALLED' BY CAPTAIN SIR TOM'S 'SPIRIT OF HOPE'

    Ms Ingram-Moore said that the world had become "enthralled" by her father's spirit of hope, positivity and resilience.

    She added: "We are so proud of the way you handled everything that happened.

    "We have been so close as a family before this but we were thrust even closer together as the world became enthralled by your spirit of hope, positivity and resilience.

    "They too saw your belief in kindness and the fundamental goodness of the human spirit."

  • CARE HOMES CAN IMPOSE ‘NO JAB, NO JOB’ WORK CONTRACTS

    Care homes can can impose 'no jab, no job' contracts on new staff, the Justice Secretary has confirmed.

    Robert Buckland said care homes must have "obvious rationale" to require employees to be vaccinated.

    Read more here.

  • CAPTAIN TOM ON THE SECRET TO OLD AGE

    “People often ask me what the secret to old age is, but I really don’t have one other than to keep breathing.

    “I’ve never paid much attention to health advice and have eaten whatever I liked. The good news is that when you get to my age everyone treats you with kindness and respect.

    “You can’t put a foot wrong because no one dares argue with you.

    “I am also often asked if I have a “bucket list” and although there are a few places I have said I might hope to visit, I’ve done almost all that I want to do and, in any event, I’m afraid to mention anything.”

  • COVID VACCINE ROLLOUT BY AGE 'MAKES SENSE', FORMER GOVERNMENT ADVISER SAYS

    The move to continue the rollout of the coronavirus vaccine by age rather than prioritising frontline professions "makes sense", a former Government scientific adviser has said.

    Professor Sir Mark Walport, former chief scientific adviser to the Government, said the strategy maximised the number of vaccines on a basis of the most vulnerable.

    Sir Mark told BBC Breakfast on Saturday: "The rollout is going in such an efficient way by doing it through the ages.

    "Of course, there will be many teachers, many police, who are in the 40-50 age group and indeed who will have been immunised already. So, it does make sense.

    "It's still the case that most of the vulnerability, including in those professions which mix with a lot of people, is still with the older members of those cohorts, and so this is a strategy that maximises the number of vaccines and does it on a basis of the most vulnerable."

  • CAPTAIN TOM MOORE 'SERVED AS AN INSPIRATION TO US ALL'

    The celebrant conducting the funeral of Captain Sir Tom Moore said: "It's quite incredible to think that 163 countries donated to (Sir Tom's) fundraiser - that's almost the whole world.

    "As wonderful as we think our NHS is, people from other countries really aren't going to be interested in our health, so it seems obvious to me that they were really investing in Captain Tom and the values he stood for.

    "He was a proud British veteran and a gentleman, he lived in a multi-generational environment, not only would that have kept him young, but also symbolises the importance of family to him.

    "What sacrifices did he and his peers make in defence of our freedom, a man with a strong moral compass, a strong work ethic, a sense of pride and an indomitable spirit.

    "He serves as an inspiration to us all to never give up and always stay strong knowing tomorrow will be a better day."

  • CAPTAIN SIR TOM MOORE REMEMBERED AS A ‘KEIGHLEY LAD’ IN HIS HOME TOWN

    A wreath remembering Captain Sir Tom Moore has been laid on behalf of the Queen in his home town in Yorkshire.

    The deputy Lord Lieutenant of West Yorkshire, David Pearson, laid the wreath, which featured 200 white roses around a picture of the late record-breaking fundraiser, at the plaque dedicated to him in the centre of Keighley.

    The memorial, which was unveiled with Sir Tom present in July last year, is next to the town’s war memorial, which his grandfather built.

    Wreaths of poppies were also laid by local MP Robbie Moore and the town’s mayor and mayoress, Peter Corkindale and Clare Abberton.

    Sir Tom was made an honorary freeman of Keighley last summer when he said “it really is great to be back” as the plaque was unveiled in his honour.

  • WATCH: CAPTAIN SIR TOM MOORE RECEIVES GUARD OF HONOUR AND RAF FLYPAST AT FUNERAL PROCESSION

    Captain Sir Tom Moore receives guard of honour and RAF flypast at NHS fundraising hero’s funeral procession
  • DOING IT FOR THE KIDS

    Pfizer is to start testing its Covid vaccine on children as young as five.

    The pharmaceutical company's boss said it has already finished enrolling volunteers aged 12 to 15 and is now looking at younger subjects.

    Read more here.

  • CAPTAIN SIR TOM MOORE'S DAUGHTERS GIVE HEARTFELT EULOGIES AT NHS HERO'S FUNERAL

    His daughter Ms Teixeira, 52, then paid tribute to Sir Tom, who captured the hearts of the nation with his fundraising efforts during the first coronavirus lockdown when he walked 100 laps of his Bedfordshire garden before his 100th birthday, raising more than £32 million for the NHS.

    She said: "Daddy, you always told us 'best foot forward' and true to your word that's what you did last year, raising a fortune for the NHS and walking your way into the nation's hearts."

    Ms Teixeira added: "Daddy, I am so proud of you, what you achieved your whole live and especially in the last year. You may be gone but your message and your spirit lives on."

    Ms Ingram-Moore said that the world had become "enthralled" by her father's spirit of hope, positivity and resilience.

    She added: "We are so proud of the way you handled everything that happened. We have been so close as a family before this but we were thrust even closer together as the world became enthralled by your spirit of hope, positivity and resilience.

  • CAPTAIN SIR TOM MOORE'S SPIRIT LIVES ON, FAMILY TELLS FUNERAL SERVICE

    The family of Captain Sir Tom Moore have paid tribute to the veteran and NHS charity fundraiser at his funeral, saying his "message and his spirit lives on".

    Sir Tom's coffin, draped in a union flag, was carried to the crematorium on Saturday by soldiers from the Yorkshire Regiment while a Second World War-era C-47 Dakota performed a flypast.

    This was followed by a firing party of 14 each firing three rounds in unison before a small service got under way.

    The service, at Bedford Crematorium, was attended by eight members of Sir Tom's immediate family - his two daughters Hannah Ingram-Moore and Lucy Teixeira, four grandchildren and his sons-in-law - all wearing masks.

    It opened with the charity single Sir Tom recorded with Michael Ball and the NHS Voices of Care Choir, You'll Never Walk Alone, which reached number one in the UK singles charts in April last year.

  • LOCKDOWN TO BE LIFTED UNIFORMLY ACROSS COUNTRY

    The Government plans to lift lockdown uniformly across the country, with no return to the tier system.

    Schools will reopen on March 8, while on March 29, the rule of six returns outdoors.

    April 12 will see shops reopen for customers again, with hairdressers and barbers back, along with nail salons.

    From May, pubs and restaurants will be allowed to have indoor service again – with the rule of six or two households in place.

    And during the same month, two households will finally be able to mix indoors – and stay overnight. After June it’s hoped that all other restrictions on where people can go are hoped to be lifted.

  • TEACHERS AND COPS WILL NOT BE BUMPED UP VACCINE QUEUE

    People in their 40s will be next in line for Covid jabs from mid-April but teachers and cops will not be bumped up the queue, officials revealed yesterday.

    The Scottish Government said it was following expert advice, which claimed vaccinating age groups in order would prevent slowing down the rollout and deliver "the greatest benefit in the shortest time".

    But education and police unions blasted the move, insisting their members should be prioritised due to their frontline pandemic roles.

    All over-50s and those with health issues are due to be inoculated by April 15, following health, social care and care home workers ? priority groups 1-9 under the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation guidance.

    Confirming that those aged 40-49 would be next, national clinical director Jason Leitch said: "The boffins have decided and we've decided to accept their advice.

  • CLEAR MESSAGING KEY TO GETTING PUBLIC TO STICK TO RULES AFTER JAB - SAGE

    Good communication with the public is vital to prevent people abandoning social distancing measures after being vaccinated, a committee of experts advising the Government has warned.

    The Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (Sage) said those who had received a jab might be less inclined to stick to the rules unless the science behind transmission is explained to them.

    In a recent paper, the group added that the success of the vaccine rollout may mean even those who have not had a dose may "perceive there is no longer a major risk to vulnerable people".

    Sage noted 20% of UK adults have received a first dose of vaccine while 16% believe they have recovered from the virus - a belief associated with perceptions of immunity. It warned these figures may create the impression the threat has permanently receded, making it harder to stick to restrictions on seeing friends or family.

    "As restrictions change, messaging should be careful to ensure that the importance of continued adherence to protective measures is well explained," Sage said.

  • MATT HANCOCK HAILS SUN READERS FOR ‘AMAZING’ JABS ARMY AMID ‘UNBELIEVABLY BRILLIANT’ EFFORT

    Matt Hancock hails Sun readers for ‘amazing’ Jabs Army amid ‘unbelievably brilliant’ effort
  • SAGE SCIENTIST WARNS PEOPLE WON'T FOLLOW RESTRICTIONS PROPERLY AFTER GETTING VACCINATED

    Sage behavioural scientist Professor Susan Michie has warned people may follow the lockdown restrictions less strictly after getting vaccinated for coronavirus.

    Following a paper of hers being published by the Government advisory group on Friday, she told BBC Radio 4's Today programme: "The concern is that as the vaccination programme rolls out and more people are getting vaccinated themselves and seeing other people in their community getting vaccinated, that people may drop their guard."

    She said evidence comes from Lyme disease and influenza vaccine rollouts where those vaccinated were less likely to adhere to preventative behaviours.

    In national surveys from December, some 29% of people said that after getting vaccinated they would adhere less strictly and 11% said they would not follow the rules.

  • RUSSIA REPORTS 11,534 NEW COVID-19 CASES & 439 DEATHS

    Russia on Saturday reported 11,534 new COVID-19 cases in the last 24 hours, including 1,825 in Moscow, taking the national tally to 4,234,720 since the pandemic began.

    The government coronavirus taskforce also reported 439 deaths in the last 24 hours, pushing the official death toll to 85,743.

  • SCHOOL LEADERS' SECRETARY SAYS NOT ALL SECONDARY PUPILS WILL RETURN TO CLASS ON MARCH 8

    Geoff Barton, general secretary of the Association of School and College Leaders (ASCL), said not all secondary students will return to the classroom on March 8 due to the need to test them all for coronavirus.

    He told BBC Breakfast on Saturday: "It's not going to be life as normal.

    "I think for primary children they will largely be able to go back into their primary schools and although it's not going to feel absolutely normal, teachers will start to get them back into the rhythms and routines that will be, for the majority, exactly what they need.

    "Secondaries are a different issue. MASH-style field hospitals essentially are having to be set up in order to do these lateral flow tests.

    "We shouldn't expect that on the 8th all pupils will be back in, it will be from the 8th because we have to get those tests under those young people's belts first."

  • NEW ZEALAND PM ORDERS AUCKLAND BACK INTO LOCKDOWN AS NEW COVID CASES EMERGE

    Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern ordered New Zealand's largest city back into lockdown on Saturday as Covid-19 cases continued to be detected in the community.

    The latest restrictions in Auckland will last at least seven days and come less than two weeks after a three-day shutdown in the city.

    Ardern said a new coronavirus case confirmed on Saturday could not be directly connected to other positive tests over the last two weeks, although a school in South Auckland was a common link.

    From Sunday morning the city's 1.7 million residents must stay at home except for essential shopping and work.

    Schools and non-essential shops will close, and entry in and out of the city will be restricted.

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