Great Britain

Cabinet reshuffle UK 2021: Boris Johnson continues to appoint new ministers as Liz Truss starts first day at new job

STILL GOING

FRESHLY promoted Cabinet ministers are settling into their new posts - while junior MPs are anxiously waiting to learn if they've got a job.

New Foreign Secretary Liz Truss beamed as she sat pride of place beside Boris Johnson in the Commons earlier today.

And Culture Secretary Nadine Dorries hit the ground running with a session in Parliament - just hours after being appointed in a brutal reshuffle.

The PM yesterday took an axe to his Cabinet by demoting Dominic Raab and sacking four ministers including gaffe-prone Gavin Williamson.

He has temporarily paused the shake-up of junior positions while he meets foreign leaders in Downing Street.

On a second dramatic day of his surprise reshuffle the PM is set to chop and change another series of key ministerial posts.

Long-serving schools minister Nick Gibb has been given the chop in a move that stunned Westminster.

And this morning ex Cabinet heavyweight Penny Mordaunt was also shifted from her role as Paymaster General to trade minister.

Defence secretary Ben Wallace insisted colleagues weren't sacked for "incompetence" but because the PM wanted to "bring on talent".

Read our Boris Johnson live blog below for the latest updates...

  • THE NEW EDUCATION SECRETARY, NADHIM ZAHAWI, ‘HONOURED’ TO BE WORKING AT THE DOE

    The new education secretary, Nadhim Zahawi, says he’s honoured to be working at the Department for Education in his new role:

    He said: “Children and young people have had a tough time during this pandemic and I’ll be listening to them and their families as we accelerate our work to build back better and fairer.

    “From my own experience, I know what a beacon of opportunity this country can be and I want all children, young people and adults to have access to a brilliant education, the right qualifications and opportunities to secure good jobs. That’s both vital for them and also our economy and is more important now than ever before.

    “I can’t wait to get started, working with the amazing teachers and staff in our nurseries, schools, colleges and universities as well as employers and businesses.”

  • GAVIN WILLIAMSON ‘LEAST POPULAR MEMBER OF THE CABINET’

    Boris Johnson sacked four members of the cabinet as part of his latest reshuffle.

    They were: Gavin Williamson, who was education secretary; Robert Jenrick, who was housing secretary; Robert Buckland, who was justice secretary; and Amanda Milling, who was Conservative Party co-chair.

    Dominic Raab, who had been the foreign secretary, was demoted to justice secretary.

    According to data from ConservativeHome, Mr Williamson was the least popular member of the cabinet with Conservative party members.

    While Liz Truss, who has been promoted to foreign secretary from international trade secretary, was the most popular.

  • PM AND CROWN PRINCE OF UAE DISCUSSED 'IMPORTANCE OF EXPANDING TRADE IN FUTURE'

    Earlier today, Boris Johnson met with Prince Mohammed bin Zayed al Nahyan. 

    Since their meeting, a Downing Street spokesperson has revealed the pair spoke about the "importance of expanding trade between the UK and UAE in future". 

    Mr Johnson also "welcomed" the UAE's efforts on climate change, ahead of the COP26 summit in November. 

    They discussed the situation in Afghanistan, agreeing on the need for international cooperation. 

  • MORE JUNIOR MINISTERIAL APPOINTMENTS REVEALED

  • PATEL: ‘THERE IS STILL SO MUCH MORE TO DO’

    Priti Patel has said it is “a huge privilege” to remain at the Home Office amid Boris Johnson’s Cabinet reshuffle.

    “A huge privilege to continue serving as Home Secretary under our Prime Minister Boris Johnson,” she tweeted.

    “There is still so much more to do to deliver for the British people. Tackling illegal migration, cutting crime and continuing to keep our great country safe.”

  • MORE JUNIOR MINISTER APPOINTMENTS ANNOUNCED

  • EXPLAINED: WHY WAS DOMINIC RAAB DEMOTED?

    Embattled Dominic Raab accepted a humiliating shunting from Foreign to Justice Secretary following a terse meeting with the PM.

    However, he said he was “delighted” to have been appointed Justice Secretary and Deputy Prime Minister and will turn his attention to cutting crime.

    His handling of the crisis in Afghanistan put him under severe pressure – with other cabinet figures briefing heavily against him, and opposition parties demanding he resign or be sacked.

    To soften the blow of his demotion, Boris Johnson gave Raab the job title of Deputy Prime Minister – a symbolic promotion from his role as First Secretary of State.

    He is said to have fought hard for his new title in desperate negotiations with the PM.

    Prime Ministers are not obliged to choose a deputy and the role has no more formal power than First Secretary of State – it just sounds better.

  • LIZ TRUSS MAKES FRIENDS ON HER FIRST DAY AT WORK

    Liz Truss got straight in there today, and has already made a very important friend at No.10.

    She was snapped wooing Larry the Cat with some head scratches during a trip to Downing Street.

  • NUMBER 10 ANNOUNCES MORE GOVERNMENT SACKINGS

    Number 10 has announced a number of new sackings as part of Boris Johnson's reshuffle of his government.

    They include Jesse Norman, who was financial secretary to the Treasury; Luke Hall, who was minister for regional growth and local government, and Justin Tomlinson, who was a minister at the Department for Work and Pensions.

    Number 10 has also confirmed the departures of John Whittingdale, who was a minister at the Department for Digital, Culture Media and Sport.

  • NEW SCHOOLS MINISTER ANNOUNCED

    Robin Walker has revealed he is to replace Nick Gibb as schools minister at the Department for Education.

  • EXPLAINED: JUST HOW DIVERSE IS THE NEW CABINET?

    In an analysis, The Sutton Trust charity has found that 60% of Boris Johnson's new cabinet were privately educated.

    This is slightly down from Mr Johnson's previous cabinet (65%). And it compares to 29% of all MPs in the House of Commons who were privately educated, and roughly 7% of the entire population.

    The Sutton Trust also found that 47% of the new cabinet attended either Oxford or Cambridge universities, which compares with 27% of all Conservative MPs, 18% of Labour MPs and 24% of all MPs.

    And more than a quarter (27%) of the new cabinet were educated at both an independent school and Oxbridge.

  • NEW CABINET APPOINTMENTS ENJOY FIRST DAY IN THEIR NEW JOBS

    Education Secretary Nadhim Zahawi, Chief Secretary to the Treasury Simon Clarke and Foreign Secretary Liz Truss have all tweeted on their first day in their new roles.

  • NADHIM ZAHAWI MAKES HIMSELF AT HOME

    New Education Secretary Nadhim Zahawi settles into his new department.

    He shared pictures of himself meeting officials - and making himself comfortable in axed Gavin Williamson's old office.

    Zahawi has been promoted to the Cabinet as a reward for his work as vaccines minister.

  • JOHN WHITTINGDALE OUT AS CULTURE MINISTER

    John Whittingdale tweeted to say he was "stepping down" as a minister in the Culture Department this morning.

    A former Culture Secretary, he only yesterday made a keynote speech to the Royal Television Society.

    But his absence in the Commons earlier for Culture Questions all but confirmed his departure.

  • ROW AS STARMER ALLY TAKES AIM AT ZAHAWI

    A Labour frontbencher sparked a furious row this morning by accusing Iraqi-refugee and new Education Secretary Nadhim Zahawi of not knowing hardship.

    West Streeting lamented "yet another Education Secretary that didn't go to state school like most people."

    Fuming Tories rallied to Mr Zahawi's defence - pointing out that he fled Saddam Hussein to the UK as a child without be able to speak a word of English.

    Conservative MP Richard Holden tweeted: "This is unbelievably cheap from the normally pretty sensible Wes Streeting."

  • NADINE ALREADY IN POST

    No time to ease into the job for Nadine Dorries, who is taking questions in the Commons just hours after being appointed Culture Secretary.

    Tory MPs are congratulating Dorries for her promotion from junior health minister.

    Dorries is an accomplished author and famously appeared on I'm A Celebrity.

  • GIBB GOING MAKES ZAHAWI'S JOB HARDER

    You may have never heard of him, but for the best part of a decade Nick Gibb has been quietly toiling away as a vital cog in the Department for Education.

    From 2005-2010 he served as the shadow schools minister, before taking on the role for real under David Cameron's coalition government.

    Bar a short two-year hiatus on the backbenches, Gibb has remained in post ever since.

    His experience had seemed to make him unsackable - but last night he surprisingly announced he had left the Government.

    With a fresh-faced Education Secretary in Nadhim Zahawi, who's left with a rammed in-tray, time will tell how much of a loss Gibb will be for the nation's schools.

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