The Chancellor is set to announce new Government funding in his Autumn Budget today.

Rishi Sunak will deliver his second Budget of the year at 12.30pm on Wednesday.

Former cabinet minister Robert Jenrick has said Chancellor Rishi Sunak will have to think carefully about the pressures on people on modest incomes when he delivers the Budget.

Mr Jenrick said that while there were “reasons for optimism”, the Chancellor still had to contend with rising inflation and a global supply chain shortage.

Meanwhile, treasury minister Simon Clarke has defended the release of Budget announcements to the media.

He said both he and the Chancellor are “acutely aware” of the importance of the House of Commons.

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Chancellor 'will have to think carefully'

Former cabinet minister Robert Jenrick has said Chancellor Rishi Sunak will have to think carefully about the pressures on people on modest incomes when he delivers the Budget.

Mr Jenrick said that while there were “reasons for optimism”, the Chancellor still had to contend with rising inflation and a global supply chain shortage.

“I think the OBR forecasts are going to show the economy has grown substantially therefore we are borrowing much less as a country, and that gives the Chancellor more room to invest in the future of public services like the NHS,” Mr Jenrick told Sky News.

“But I think he is also going to have to think carefully about people on the most modest incomes and how he can help them in what is undoubtedly still going to be a difficult period when we are seeing inflation rising, higher energy prices and so on.”

(Image: Copyright Unknown)

Calls for Gov to confirm public sector pay rises

Labour’s Bridget Phillipson called on the Government to confirm that the public sector pay rises “ministers told newspapers about yesterday will be real-terms pay rises, as his ministerial colleague was unable to do so on the telly this morning”.

She said: “Will he follow Labour’s lead and confirm today now that he’s with us, that he will be cutting VAT on domestic heating bills to zero for six months, and finally will he back Britain’s high street firms, freeze business rates now and replace them with a better system fast. He can tell the newspapers, it’s time for him to tell this House.”

Mr Clarke replied: “It beggars belief that the Labour Party stands here saying that a 6.6% increase in the national living wage somehow isn’t enough.”

On the cost of energy, he added: “We have the energy price cap which is protecting households – up to £100 a year off their bills – that’s the right thing to do. I think it’s something which we all recognise is a priority for all of our constituents. When it comes to business rates, we’ll be having the upshot of the review that’s being conducted.”

He added: “The disconnect between what the Labour Party is committed to and what they’ve actually funded is somewhere in the region of £400 billion committed to, with £5 billion savings to pay for it, now that is not a responsible way to run the economy.”

Treasury minister 'acutely aware' of the importance of the House of Commons

Treasury minister Simon Clarke has defended the release of Budget announcements to the media.

He said both he and the Chancellor are “acutely aware” of the importance of the House of Commons.

He said: “In 2013 the then-chancellor George Osborne asked the permanent secretary for HMT to conduct a review into the practice of the release of Budget information under embargo on Budget day. And he set out a series of recommendations. His central conclusion was that the Treasury should introduce a ban on the pre-release of the core of the budget.

“That is to say the economic and fiscal projections, the fiscal judgment and individual tax rates and reliefs and allowances. We have observed that stricture in full. And that is something which I’m obviously totally committed to continuing to do.”

Speaker Sir Lindsay Hoyle interjected: “A matter of judgment”, and when Mr Clarke told the House that it would have to wait until tomorrow for further announcements on the Government’s levelling up plans, Sir Lindsay said: “Sky TV tomorrow”.

Labour MP Dame Angela Eagle said “this is serious”.

“As an Opposition we cannot look in detail at the slew, this blizzard of Budget announcements which has been going on for week after week”.

She added: “This is treating parliamentary democracy with utter contempt, and the minister should be completely ashamed of himself, he should have come to this House and apologised, his boss should have come to this House and apologised.”

'Already falling apart'

Shadow Treasury minister Bridget Phillipson said the Chancellor “hasn’t even delivered his Budget yet and it’s already falling apart”.

She said: “We face an urgent cost-of-living crisis. Prices are up in our shops, at our petrol pumps and on our heating bills. Families and businesses are waiting and hoping for the Chancellor to take the action that they need and which our country desperately needs, but the Chancellor hasn’t even delivered his Budget yet and it’s already falling apart.

“In recent days we have read thousands of words about what the Chancellor plans to do, but the silence is deafening on the soaring bills and rising prices facing families and businesses.”

She said: “Will he justify properly withholding from Parliament decisions that he and his colleagues have given to the press?”

Bridget Phillipson MP (Image: PA)

Speaker critical of briefings

Sir Lindsay Hoyle has again been critical of Budget briefings being given ahead of Wednesday’s statement from Chancellor Rishi Sunak.

The Commons Speaker highlighted that the ministerial code states important announcements of Government policy should be made to Parliament first when it is in session.

Sir Lindsay, who has granted two urgent questions in two days to force ministers to answer questions on the Budget, told MPs: “I was disappointed to see more stories in the media today with apparently very well-briefed information about what will be in tomorrow’s Budget.”

He accused the Government of treating the Commons in a “discourteous manner”, adding: “This House will not be taken for granted, it’s not right for everybody to briefed, it’s not more important to go on the news in the morning, it’s more important to come here.”

Sir Lindsay Hoyle in the House of Commons, London (Image: PA)

Questions over pre-budget announcements

A Treasury minister will face questions in the Commons over the extent of the pre-Budget announcements.

Shadow chief secretary of the Treasury Bridget Phillipson has been granted an urgent question calling for “details of all the provisions in the upcoming Budget that have been made public in advance of the Chancellor’s statement”.

Commons Speaker Sir Lindsay Hoyle has already rebuked the Government about the number of announcements made ahead of Rishi Sunak’s appearance on Wednesday.

The urgent question will be asked at around 12.30pm.

What time is the budget?

Rishi Sunak is set to deliver his second Budget of the year at 12.30pm today.

Stay tuned for the latest updates.