Great Britain

Brexit news live – Boris tells EU ‘no more bets’ as Britain intensifies trade talks with US instead

PM Boris Johnson told industry leaders "rien ne va plus" or "no more bets" according to a source who was on the call.

It comes as Britain intensifies trade talks with the U.S, trade minister Liz Truss said yesterday announcing the start of a fifth round of negotiations focused on goods tariffs.

“Were intensifying negotiations so we are in a good position to move forward after the (U.S.) election,” Truss said on Twitter.

“We want a deal that delivers for all parts of (Britain) and is forward-leaning in modern areas like tech & services.”

Meanwhile, Johnson blasted the EU for the collapse of the post-Brexit trade deal talks.

The Prime Minister told the Greek PM there will be no more Brexit trade talks with Brussels unless the EU completely changes its stance, claiming again that the bloc has "effectively ended those negotiations”.

Follow our Brexit live blog for all the latest news and updates…

  • RECAP – EU'S BARNIER URGES BRITAIN TO USE 'LITTLE TIME LEFT' FOR POST-BREXIT DEAL

    The EU's chief negotiator Michel Barnier urged Britain Tuesday to use the little time that remains to clinch a post-Brexit deal, with London refusing to restart talks until Brussels signals willingness to make concessions.

    “My message: we should be making the most out of the little time left. Our door remains open,” Barnier tweeted after a phone call with his UK counterpart David Frost.

  • RECAP – THERE'S 'HOPE'

    Michael Gove yesterday said the door is “ajar” for Brexit trade talks — just days after the PM said they are over.

    The senior Cabinet minister lashed Brussels for refusing to compromise, but held out the hope an 11th- hour deal could be brokered.

    The crunch talks had collapsed after French president Emmanuel Macron sunk them in a row over fishing rights.

    Mr Gove warned a No Deal Brexit would be “particularly difficult for France’s economy”.

    But quizzed on whether the door for talks is still open, he said: “It is ajar.”

  • CONTINUED

    A No10 spokesman said tonight of talks between Brexit chiefs Michel Barnier and David Frost: “This was a constructive discussion. 

    “The UK has noted the EU’s proposal to genuinely intensify talks, which is what would be expected at this stage in a negotiation.

    “However, the UK continues to believe there is no basis to resume talks unless there is a fundamental change of approach from the EU.

    “This means an EU approach consistent with trying to find an agreement between sovereign equals and with acceptance that movement needs to come from the EU side as well as the UK. 

    “The two teams agreed to remain in close touch.”

  • RECAP – NO DEAL

    Britain has today rejected fresh Brexit talks unless the EU dramatically shift their positions – despite the EU u-turning on fresh talks.

    As Michael Gove denounced further meetings as “pointless” in the House of Commons today, EU chief negotiator Michel Barnier caved to pressure and agreed to “intensified” discussions.

    After Boris Johnson's gave up talks last week, Mr Gove told MPs a Canada-style free trade agreement “would not now happen” and told businesses to “get ready” for No Deal.

    And Mr Gove said this afternoon: “There needs to be a fundamental change in approach from the EU if the process is to get back on track.”

    The Government threw out demands for fresh talks, saying there needed to be even more change.

  • PEERS DEFY GOVERNMENT IN DEMANDING SAFEGUARDS FOR UK FOOD STANDARDS

    Peers have inflicted further defeats on the Government in their bid to protect UK food standards in future trade deals.

    Despite previous Lords changes to the Agriculture Bill being rejected by the Commons, the upper chamber has continued to demand quality safeguards on imported agricultural and food imports to prevent British farmers being undermined.

    The legislative tussle – known as parliamentary “ping pong” where legislation is passed between the two Houses – comes amid continuing concerns over chlorinated chicken or hormone-treated beef entering the UK market from the US.

    The Government has argued existing protections are already in place and they have no intention of watering them down.

    With the Bill returning to the unelected house after reverses in the Commons, peers again pressed the case on standards.

    PA

  • OUTGOING BBC CHAIRMAN SAYS REPLACEMENT WITHOUT MPS' APPROVAL WOULD BE DIFFICULT

    It would be “difficult” for the Government to appoint a new chairman of the BBC without the approval of MPs, the outgoing incumbent has said.

    Sir David Clementi, who stands down in February, said any candidate would have to appear before a Digital, Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) committee.

    Names linked with the post include former chancellor George Osborne and ex-editor of the Daily Telegraph Charles Moore, who has reportedly ruled himself out.

    Sir David, speaking at a virtual Voice Of The Listener And Viewer conference, said while it may be “possible” for the Government to “override” the committee, he asked: “Would that be wise?”

    He said it would be “difficult for a candidate to start” without DCMS approval.

    Culture Secretary Oliver Dowden has previously said the Government wants a “strong, big person who can hold the BBC to account” to fill the role.

  • BORIS JOHNSON REFUSING TO RESTART BREXIT NEGOTIATIONS DESPITE NEARING DEADLINE

    The UK rejected proposals for further discussions this week after Boris Johnson accused the EU of being too harsh and demanded that the blog has a “fundamental change in approach”.

  • CONTINUED

    Mr Gove said: “I am hugely appreciative of the efforts that so many companies have made over the course of this year, both to help us deal with the Covid crisis and also to prepare for the end of the transition period.

    “We know that this December 31 we will be leaving the customs union and single market come what may. It's in law, and it's a fact that the EU and UK accept as immoveable, and that means we need to make sure we're ready.”

  • PM & CABINET MINISTER GOVE EXPRESSED HOPES OF A SUCCESSFUL BREXIT TRANSITION PERIOD

    Prime Minister Boris Johnson and Cabinet Office minister Michael Gove have expressed hopes of a successful Brexit transition period after speaking to 250 business leaders on Tuesday.

    With the UK insisting it may need to leave the bloc on “Australian-style” trade terms, rather than a more comprehensive agreement, Mr Johnson insisted Britain would prosper outside the EU.

    The Prime Minister said: “Our job is to create the platform for dynamic businesses such as yours to compete and to grow. But it is vital that everybody on this call takes seriously the need to get ready, because whatever happens – whether it's Canada or Australia – change is going to happen.

    “There is a big opportunity for this country and we want to help all of you to seize that opportunity.”

  • UK SAYS TRADE TALKS WITH U.S ARE INTENSIFYING

    Britain and the United States are intensifying trade talks, trade minister Liz Truss said on Tuesday, announcing the start of a fifth round of negotiations focused on goods tariffs.

    Britain has put a trade deal with the United States at the top of its post-Brexit wish list, having cited the freedom to strike bilateral deals as one of the main benefits of leaving the European Union.

    “Were intensifying negotiations so we are in a good position to move forward after the (U.S.) election,” Truss said on Twitter.

    “We want a deal that delivers for all parts of (Britain) and is forward-leaning in modern areas like tech & services.”

  • LONDON STOCKS RISE ON HOPES OF BREXIT TRADE DEAL

    London stocks closed higher on Tuesday as investors remained hopeful of a trade deal with the European Union by year-end, although gains were capped by concerns over tougher coronavirus lockdowns in parts of England.

    The blue-chip FTSE 100 closed 0.1% up, led by personal goods makers, food and drug retailers , real estate investment trusts and travel and leisure stocks.

    The domestically focused mid-cap FTSE 250 ended 0.4% higher, boosted by soft drinks maker Britvic Plc, which jumped 6.4% as it forecast annual adjusted operating profit ahead of market expectations.

  • GOVERNMENT 'ALIENATING' FARMERS OVER POST-BREXIT REFORMS SAYS TORY MINISTER

    The Government is “alienating” farmers and people living in the countryside by being “intransigent” over its post-Brexit agriculture reforms, a Tory former minister said.

    Peers inflicted several defeats on the Government during the passage of the Agriculture Bill, which were then overturned in the Commons.

    In a Lords debate – part of the parliamentary “ping pong”, where legislation is passed between the two Houses – Tory peer the Earl of Caithness said: “The Government has been unnecessarily obstructive and intransigent on this Bill.

    “And that is a huge sadness because they are alienating a lot of farmers and a lot of those who live in the country who see the Government as being unnecessarily reluctant to accept any improvements to this Bill.”

  • UK MUST PROTECT RIGHTS OF EU CITIZENS, REGARDLESS OF DEAL

    Protecting the rights of EU citizens must be a priority whether the UK leaves the bloc with a trade deal or not, according to a new report.

    A cross-party study by the Commons Committee on the Future Relationship with the European Union has called on EU nationals in the UK and British citizens in the 27 bloc states “to live and work in the country where they reside”.

    The report insisted UK nationals should have access to information to ensure that they know how to secure their rights.

    The committee stated: “The priority must be to ensure as many people as possible understand what they need to do to secure their rights, and that as few as possible are inadvertently deprived of these rights because they did not act in time, or did not know what they had to do.”

    The study said that it was still unclear how many citizens will apply for the EU Settlement Scheme in the UK.

  • EU'S BARNIER URGES BRITAIN TO USE 'LITTLE TIME LEFT' FOR POST-BREXIT DEAL

    The EU's chief negotiator Michel Barnier urged Britain Tuesday to use the little time that remains to clinch a post-Brexit deal, with London refusing to restart talks until Brussels signals willingness to make concessions.

    “My message: we should be making the most out of the little time left. Our door remains open,” Barnier tweeted after a phone call with his UK counterpart David Frost.

  • NO DEAL BREXIT EXPLAINED

    Boris Johnson has begun warning businesses and Britons to begin preparing for a No Deal Brexit.

    It comes after talks stalled over still-contentious issues such as fisheries, state aid and financial services.

    But what does No Deal for the future of the UK and how will it affect Brits?

    Read our handy explainer here.

  • TIMELINE: THE ROAD TO DIVORCE

    • JANUARY 2013: David Cameron promises a referendum on Britain's membership of the EU
    • JUNE 23, 2016: People of Britain vote in favour of Brexit by 52 per cent to 48 per cent, and Cameron resigns
    • JANUARY 18, 2017: Theresa May takes a hard line on talks with the EU, saying: “No deal is better than a bad deal.”
    • JANUARY 29, 2019: The first Brexit deadline passes after the UK asks the EU for an extension
    • JULY 13, 2020: The Government begins an ad campaign urging firms to prepare for end of transition period
    • SEPTEMBER 22, 2020: Cabinet minister Michael Gove sends a letter to hauliers warning about a queue of 7,000 lorries in Kent
    • OCTOBER 13, 2020: Treasury and cabinet office minister Lord Agnew says businesses have their “heads in sand” over Brexit changes
    • JANUARY 1, 2021: End of transition period. If there is no deal, UK will revert to World Trade Organisation terms, including tariffs

  • EU: 'PRETTY OBVIOUS' BOTH SIDES WILL NEED TO COMPROMISE IN POST-BREXIT TALKS

    The European Union has signalled it is prepared to make compromises in order to revive trade talks with the UK – as long as Boris Johnson's Government also gives ground.

    Lead negotiators Lord Frost and Michel Barnier were speaking to each other again on Tuesday but official trade talks remain in limbo.

    Downing Street has insisted there is no point in resuming negotiations unless the EU is prepared to fundamentally change its position in key areas.

    Brussels said both sides will need to compromise if an agreement is to be reached, with time running out for a deal to be in place when the transition arrangements expire at the end of the year.

    European Commission spokesman Eric Mamer told reporters in Brussels: “I think it is pretty obvious that in order to come to an agreement both sides need to meet and this is also obviously the case in this negotiation.”

  • PM WARNS BUSINESS TO PLAN FOR END OF BREXIT TRANSITION

    Boris Johnson will tell business to step up preparations for the end of the Brexit transition after Downing Street refused to resume talks with the EU.

    With just 10 weeks until the transition finishes, Mr Johnson and the senior Cabinet minister Michael Gove will use a conference call on Tuesday to tell business leaders they should be ready for major change regardless of whether there is a deal with Brussels.

    The warning comes after the Government rebuffed a fresh attempt by the EU to restart the negotiations on a post-Brexit free trade deal agreement after they were abruptly halted by the Prime Minister.

  • NO DEAL BREXIT TO CUT BENTLEY'S PROFITS BY QUARTER

    Failure to strike a Brexit trade deal with the EU would be “extremely damaging” and cut profits by up to a quarter at carmaker Bentley, its boss told Reuters, as the government urges firms to plan for potential disruption.

    Britain said on Monday there was still no basis for talks with Brussels to resume, just over two months before free and unfettered trade is due to end, leading to possible tariffs, customs checks and long delays for imports and exports.

    The Volkswagen-owned luxury brand has spent millions to prepare, including stockpiling, switching ports and a provisional air freight contract, but warned on failure to find an agreement.

    “It would be extremely damaging,” Chief Executive Adrian Hallmark told Reuters on Tuesday.

    “If you took the duties on components, 45% of the bits we buy in, and the 10% tariff on cars, worst-case scenario, it would take out a significant percentage of our profits,” he said. “(It) would probably cost us 20% to 25%.”

  • EU COMMISSIONER SAYS BARNIER TEAM REMAINS COMMITTED TO REACHING A DEAL WITH UK

    The European Union remains absolutely committed to reaching a post-Brexit trade deal with Britain and chief negotiator Michel Barnier stands ready to travel to London to intensify talks, EU Financial Services Commissioner Mairead McGuinness said.

    Britain stood firm on Tuesday in rebutting an EU offer to discuss draft legal texts of a potential post-Brexit trade deal unless there were fundamental changes, as their high-stakes diplomatic poker game risked a chaotic finale.

    “The European Union remains absolutely committed to reaching a deal, our door is open and will remain open until the very last moment… but time is short,” McGuinness, who was appointed to her role this month, told an online conference on Tuesday.

    “Michel Barnier and his team stand ready to go to London to intensify the work with (British chief negotiator) David Frost and his team to develop the legal text.”

  • DAIMLER CEO SAYS MERCEDES WOULD NOT OPEN UK FACTORIES IN EVENT OF HARD BREXIT

    “I am hoping for last-minute common sense,” Kallenius said in response to a question about his expectations on the outcome of Brexit talks.

    If Britain and the European Union fail to clinch a deal, World Trade Organization (WTO) rules would apply, resulting in tariffs.

    “In the event of a so-called hard Brexit, we would not open factories, because this would not be worth it, given our sales numbers,” Kaellenius said, referring to sales in Britain.

    “We would have to learn to live with WTO rules.”

  • WHAT IS A NO DEAL BREXIT?

    Boris Johnson has begun warning businesses and Britons to begin preparing for a No Deal Brexit.

    It comes after talks stalled over still-contentious issues such as fisheries, state aid and financial services.

    But what does No Deal for the future of the UK and how will it affect Brits?

    Read our handy explainer here.

  • MPS VOTE TO REMOVE CHILD REFUGEE PROTECTIONS FROM FLAGSHIP IMMIGRATION LAW

    The Government has stripped out protections for lone child refugees from flagship immigration legislation that will end EU freedom-of-movement rules in the UK.

    MPs voted 327 votes to 264 – majority 63 – to remove an amendment made by peers which would have required the Government to ensure unaccompanied children in the EU continue to be relocated with close relatives in the UK.

    The division list showed six Conservative MPs rebelled to try and keep the measure in the Bill, including former ministers David Davis and Tim Loughton.

    The amendment to continue existing arrangements had been successfully moved in the House of Lords by refugee campaigner and Labour peer Lord Dubs, who fled the Nazis as a child on the Kindertransport.

    The Immigration and Social Security Co-ordination (EU Withdrawal) Bill is part of the move towards the Government's new points-based immigration system, to be introduced from 2021.

  • STRESS FREE GUIDE TO TRAVELLING TO EUROPE AFTER BREXIT

    With all the uncertainty creat­ed by the coronavirus pandemic over the last few months, many travellers could be forgiven for not having thought about the impact of Brexit.

    But come January 1, there are a raft of changes that any Brit travelling to Europe MUST consider.

    During this year’s transition period, nothing has changed but things will be very different when we officially leave and it pays to be prepared as we exit the EU’s single market and free-movement zone.

    And with the big break just months away, today we look at everything to check if heading to any EU country next year.

    Read more of the guide here.

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