Great Britain

Brexit news latest – Brits face extra hour in airport queues as EU deal talks ‘intensify’

BRITS could face an extra hour in airport queues after the EU rejected pleas to grant the UK access to fast lanes.

It comes as talks with the bloc have intensified this weekend as the two sides aim to strike a deal in the coming weeks.

Emmanuel Macron is also ready to soften demands that the UK follows EU rules post-Brexit, including finding a compromise on fishing negotiations.

The French president's new stance is a major boost to Boris Johnson's hope of clinching a deal.

Any deal binding the UK to common standards works both ways, so No10 could hit France with lawsuits over its sky-high public spending.

Follow our Brexit live blog for all the latest news and updates…

  • CITY EXPERT SAYS FINANCIAL SECTOR 'TREATED LIKE NEGLECTED CHILD'

    Robert Oulds, director of pro-Brexit think tank the Bruges Group, has said that the UK's financial sector is being treated like a “neglected child” by the EU during Brexit negotiations.

    Mr Oulds accused the bloc of trying to punish the City of London – but said this was doomed to fail.

    He told the Daily Express: “The EU relies on the City of London.

    “It would be completely self-defeating.”

  • IRISH PM CONFIDENT ON BREXIT

    Ireland's prime minister has said he thinks Britain and the EU will strike a post-Brexit trade deal and that the resumption of talks this week is a good sign.

    “My gut instinct is that the (British) prime minister does want a deal,” Irish Prime Minister Micheal Martin told an online conference.

  • MAY'S MISTAKE

    A recent report by Lee Rotherham, the former director of Special Projects at Vote Leave, has criticised former prime minister Theresa May's negotiations with the EU.

    Mr Rotherham claimed that May had made “a catastrophic strategic error” during negotiations, and tried to “minimise change rather than embrace the referendum mandate”.

    He added that, if the former PM had gone for a Free Trade Agreement from the start, the talks may not have reached the current impasse.

  • UK PROTECTS FOODS WITH NEW SCHEME

    New rules to guarantee the authenticity and origin of traditional British foods, such as Stilton cheese and Melton Mowbray pork pies after the end of the Brexit transition period, were set out by the government this week.

    At the end of the transition period, the new and independent Geographical Indications (GI) schemes will ensure popular and traditional produce from across Britain will be granted special status to mark out their authenticity and origin.

    Products such as Scotch whisky, Welsh lamb and Cornish clotted cream will also be covered by the schemes.

    Producers whose foods are granted GI status will benefit from intellectual property protection so that others cannot imitate them.

  • EU HOPES TO WRAP UP DISCUSSIONS BY END OF OCTOBER

    France's Europe Minister Clement Beaune said the EU wanted to wrap up the discussions by October 31 to leave enough time for parliamentary ratification across the bloc's 27 member states.

    He told the BFM Business network: “We'll give it a few days more (into November) to give a chance for the negotiations, but we need to know fairly quickly.”

  • DISRUPTION TO SUPPLIES FOR JERSEY 'MINIMAL'

    Disruption to supplies to Jersey will be minimal even in the event of a no-deal Brexit, island officials said.

    Darren Scott, a senior civil servant in Jersey, said plans to maintain sea links and infrastructure were already in place should disruption to the supply chain occur.

    Economic development director Mr Scott told the BBC: “For our key ports, we're extremely well-connected and we are extremely confident that any disruption will be extremely minimal.

    “There's a professional and robust supply chain, both from a [local ferry operator] Condor perspective, and various logistics providers will take it in their stride.”

  • TORY MP SAYS NO DEAL WILL 'RECALIBRATE' TRADE WITH NON-EU COUNTRIES

    Tory MP Daniel Kawczynski has said the UK's trade deficit with other countries will be 'recalibrated' as a result of a no-deal Brexit.

    Shrewsbury and Atcham MP Mr Kawczynski tweeted: “With massive £80 billion trade deficit every year, under such conditions we would receive far more in tariffs than we pay out, whilst recalibrating trade to non EU countries over longer term.”

  • JAPAN TRADE DEAL IS 'LANDMARK MOMENT'

    The UK's first post-Brexit deal with Japan has been hailed as a “landmark moment” by International Trade Secretary Liz Truss.

    She said the agreement, a huge boost for an independent Britain, will help us bounce back from the Covid recession.

    Brits will be able to snap up cheaper bluefin tuna, kobe beef and udon noodles thanks to the bumper trade deal.

    Read our full story here.

  • LIZ TRUSS SAYS TRADE DEALS CAN 'TURBO CHARGE' ECONOMY

    International Trade secretary Liz Truss has said that post-Brexit trade deals can help “turbo charge” the economy.

    Ms Truss told the Telegraph: “The fact is, the growth in the world is coming from the Pacific and the Americas, and those opportunities are now open to us.

    “In the EU we were in the trade slow lane – we weren't able to achieve British-shaped deals that reflected our unique strengths as a country.”

  • FRENCH MINISTER ACCUSES BORIS OF BLUFFING OVER EASE OF NO-DEAL

    A French minister has dismissed Boris Johnson's claim that the UK can “more than live with” a no-deal Brexit, The Times reports.

    Clément Beaune, the French Europe minister, told French BFM television last night: “If the British thought they could live with 'the freedom' of no deal outside of the EU — if it was so easy and so comfortable — they would have already left without a deal.”

    It comes as negotiations between the two sides ahead of the end of the transition period – though the Prime Minister has said that the UK could live with a no-deal Brexit.



  • FORMER BREXIT MINISTER SAYS EU 'SEEKING TO RETAIN CONTROL' OVER UK

    Former Brexit minister David Jones says that the EU is reluctant to give Britain a Canada-style trade deal as they want to “continue to retain control” of the UK after Brexit.

    He told the Daily Express: “I think that the EU was seeking to continue to retain control over the UK even after we left.

    “And that’s why I think they wanted their so-called level playing field which translated into plain English means they want us to adhere to their regulations indefinitely.”

    He added: “It’s coming as a shock to them that we’re standing up for our own national interests and I think the Government have done very well in that regard.”

  • BREXIT LORRY PARK 'WILL BE READY FOR JANUARY'

    A huge post-Brexit lorry park next to the M20 will be ready to hold up to 1,700 trucks from January 1, KentLive reports.

    Building work began on the 66-acre site in Ashford, Kent in July ahead of the end of the transition period next year.

    The town's MP Damian Green – who visited the site alongside Transport secretary Grant Shapps yesterday – said that construction is “progressing well” and the facility will be open in time.

  • BREXIT TRADE COSTS WILL BE 'MATERIAL' DEAL OR NO DEAL, DEUTSCHE BANK SAYS

    Deutsche Bank analysts estimate that the costs to trade between Britain and the EU will be high even if the two sides manage to strike a deal by the end of the year, as a result of the impact of non-tariff barriers.

    The analysts wrote: “Tariffs make up only a small part of the direct trade cost from leaving the EU.

    “Of more significance is the prevalence of non-tariff barriers. These will weigh on trade regardless of whether the UK and EU trade on preferential terms or not.”

  • BRITS FACE EXTRA HOUR IN AIRPORT QUEUES

    Brits going on holiday to Europe next year face an extra hour in airport queues after the EU rejected pleas to grant the UK access to fast lanes.

    The EU Commission has told Member States visitors from the UK won't be allowed to use passport e-gates from January 1.

    It means Brits will have to join long lines with arrivals from the rest of the world including the US and China.

    Read our full story here.

  • JAPAN TRADE DEAL 'UNLOCKED TALKS'

    Britain's new free trade deal with Japan provided a breakthrough in ongoing Brexit talks with the EU, according to the Telegraph.

    A source told the paper: “The British acceptance of the new baseline unlocked discussions on the issue and pointed the direction of travel for the later talks.”

    The bilateral trade deal reduces tariffs on Yorkshire lamb sold in Japan, as well as auto parts for the country's Nissan plant.

    It is also expected to boost British trade with Japan by £15 billion pounds annually.

  • TALKS CONTINUE THROUGH WEEKEND

    Talks between the UK and EU on a post-Brexit trade deal are continuing through the weekend.

    Negotiations resumed on Thursday after Boris Johnson last week called a temporary halt, accusing Brussels of refusing to compromise over the remaining differences.

    Downing Street said the two sides – led by the EU's Michel Barnier and his UK counterpart Lord Frost – were now in “intensive talks” which would carry on through to Sunday.

    Time is, however, running short if they are to get an agreement in place before the current Brexit transition period comes to an end at the end of the year.

    Both the UK and the EU had previously said that they would need to get a deal by mid-October if it was to be implemented in time.

  • MACRON READY TO SOFTEN DEMANDS

    Any deal binding the UK to common standards works both ways, so No10 could hit France with lawsuits over its sky-high public spending.

    Mr Macron also accepted he must compromise on his hardline fishing demands.

    French ministers have sounded out industry groups over concessions they are prepared to accept on access to UK waters.

    Trade secretary Liz Truss declared the two sides made “real progress”.

    But she said the PM will walk away if EU demands fail to “allow the UK to retain its sovereignty”.

    The Prime Minister’s spokesman insisted: “We want to reach an agreement as soon as possible.”

  • NO DEAL BREXIT EXPLAINED

    The UK and EU are continuing trade talks in London to salvage a post-Brexit deal before mid November.

    Negotiations continue, but the EU and UK still disagree over future arrangements for areas such as fisheries, state aid and financial services.

    But what does a No Deal Brexit mean for the UK and how will it affect us?

    Learn more in our handy explainer here.

  • They said dozens of MPs have been threatened, had graffiti daubed in their constituencies or were abused online after Deputy Leader Angela Rayner called Chris Clarkson “scum” during a debate this week.

    Senior Tories are calling on a public apology from Sir Keir and the promise of stronger action against Ms Rayner if she uses “unparliamentary” language again.

    After the row, the phrase “Tory Scum” trended on twitter, and MP’s offices were targeted

    with abusive phone calls.

    Tory MP Shaun Bailey’s mother received abuse with a member of the public copying the language of Rayner over the telephone.

    Minister Chloe Smith has been targeted locally with graffiti calling her Tory Scum.

    Caroline Johnson and others have received emails and social media abuse claiming they are “Tory scum.”

  • MINISTER QUESTIONED ON WHY FISHING IS KEY ISSUE TO UNLOCKING BREXIT STALEMATE

    Trade policy minister Greg Hands has been questioned on why the government is insisting on protecting the UK’s fishing industry at the risk of no-deal in Brexit negotiations.

    It is understood that fishing rights remain a key stumbling block in negotiations with the EU.

    Mr Hands was asked on Sky News why the government had made fishing a key part of the negotiations when the industry “has a lower turnover than Harrod's Department Store”.

    The minister replied: “What we’re trying to do is get the deal which would allow us to continue our key trade in areas like financial services and cars but don’t underestimate the importance of fishing and control over our waters.

    “It’s a key part of national sovereignty…”

  • IRISH FOREIGN MINISTER BELIEVES BREXIT DEAL IS NOW POSSIBLE

    Ireland's foreign minister said on Friday he believed Britain and the European Union could reach a trade deal now the talks were back on track.

    But he added the issues of fair competition and fisheries hampering an accord were “still very much there”.

    “When we got a deal done this time last year, a lot of people were predicting that there would be a no-deal Brexit. We're seeing history repeat itself now,” Simon Coveney, who played a key role in last year's divorce treaty, told national broadcaster RTE.

    “I think a deal can be done, I've said that for quite some time. What we have now, after all sorts of politics being played, is a process that is back on track,” he said.

    He added that both sides remained “miles apart” on fishing.

  • TORY MP 'WE HAVE TO BE AN INDEPENDENT COASTAL STATE'

    Tory MP David Jones warned Brussels will have to back down on fishing demands and accept that the country will be an independent coastal state to reach a deal.

    Mr Jones, who is deputy chair of the influential European Research Group (ERG) of Tory MPs, told Express.co.uk: “They are going to have to drop demands, for example, of full access to British fishing waters.

    “What they are trying to do is to recreate the CFP.

    “It’s almost as if they haven’t actually accepted the fact we’ve left the EU.

    “At the end of the year, we’re going to be an independent coastal state and they need to negotiate with us on an annual basis as they do, for example, with Norway.”

  • MACRON ATTEMPTED TO PUSH EU NATIONS TO TAKE HARSHER POSITION ON FISHING RIGHTS

    Emmanuel Macron tried to push other European Union leaders to agree to a much harsher position on access to British waters in the aftermath of Brexit.

    But in addition to the opposition of fellow leaders, Mr Macron appears now to be up against his own fishermen as one signalled the fleets will accept being excluded from UK waters, according to Express.co.uk.

    Speaking to TRT World, fisherman Stephane Pinto said: “Here we have at least 100 boats locally, not to mention the larger industrial boats and that means 400 families.

    “For every fisherman on a boat, there are four jobs on land.

    “If tomorrow access to British waters is forbidden, it's clear we can't work there, we will not go. We won't go against the law.”

  • TREASURY COMMITTEE WORRIED ABOUT LACK OF BREXIT PREPARATIONS

    The Government may have left it too late for businesses to prepare properly for the end of free movement of goods to and from the European Union, an influential group of ministers said on Friday.

    The British parliament's Treasury Committee has written to finance minister Rishi Sunak about their concerns over delays setting up computer systems that allow businesses to handle new customs requirements that come into force on January 1, 2021.

    “The Committee came away from its evidence session … with serious concerns about the UK's customs preparedness for the end of the Brexit transition period,” committee chair Mel Stride said.

    “I've asked the Chancellor to respond to our concerns as a matter of urgency,” he added.

  • UK SHOULD BE 'PREPARED TO WALK AWAY'

    Britain and the European Union have made real progress in Brexit trade talks and a deal is possible but if the bloc does not come to an agreement then Britain will leave without a deal, Trade Secretary Liz Truss said on Friday.

    “We're in intense negotiations with the EU – we've made real progress,” Truss said.

    “We want to get a good deal with the EU, a deal like they have with Canada, which we think is perfectly reasonable.”

    “We're making good progress on the negotiations. But if the EU aren't prepared to do a deal that allows the UK to retain its sovereignty, then we will go to Australia style terms, and I think that's perfectly reasonable.”

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