Despite its closure several years ago, an abandoned nursing home still retains reminders of its past.

The Josephine Butler nursing home in south Liverpool was previously used as a Victorian residential cottage, and was formerly home to the ship owner Gerard Lockett in the 1930s.

It was later converted into a care service for people with mental health issues, between the ages of 18 and 65.

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The abandoned home in the Sefton Park area is spread over three floors, with 21 bedrooms and huge communal rooms.

The chairs where residents once sat still remain in the building, alongside other discarded items.

Meanwhile, the once grand rooms with ornate ceilings and fireplaces now lie covered in dust and debris.

One of the ornate fireplaces still visible at the abandoned Josephine Butler Nursing Home
One of the ornate fireplaces still visible at the abandoned Josephine Butler Nursing Home

Since its closure the building has sadly fallen into a state of disrepair and many of its rooms have been vandalised.

But there are still reminders of its former grandeur, despite obvious signs of the damage wrought by people using it as a haven for drug abuse.

The last reported date of when the nursing home was still in use was back in 2016, when it received a "requires improvement" rating from independent watchdog the Care Quality Commission. At the time, there were just 12 people living in the home.

The urban explorer Abandoned Prophecy took these pictures and video on a recent visit to the site with a fellow explorer.

One of the staircases is now littered with debris
One of the staircases is now littered with debris

He said: "As soon as we went inside, we were gobsmacked at the ornate ceilings and all the old wooden doors to the main room and all the lounge and hall area. It seemed like a place of royalty.

"As we carried on exploring, we became a little disappointed because the vandals has trashed the place. There was graffiti on walls, and the banisters and windows were smashed."

Another example of the quality of the workmanship at the now abandoned home
Another example of the quality of the workmanship at the now abandoned home

The nursing home was named after the Liverpool social reformer Josephine Butler (1828-1906), who had a major role in improving conditions for women in education and public health. Her life and work is celebrated locally in the Suitcases public art installation on the junction of Hope Street and Mount Street.

She also had a building named after her in Hope Street, which was demolished in 2009.

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