England were frustrated by a valiant Scotland in their Euro 2020 Group D clash on Friday as they could only battle to a 0-0 draw against their rivals.

Few would have predicted such a close contest but the Three Lions more than met their match as they struggled to break down their opponents on home soil.

John Stones came the closest early in the match, heading Mason Mount's corner onto the post.

After that the best chances then fell to the visitors, as Jordan Pickford denied Stephen O'Donnell before Lyndon Dykes' shot was cleared off the line in the second half.

Gareth Southgate rung the changes in an attempt to galvanise his side - even substituting his underperforming captain Harry Kane - but Scotland stood firm and looked the more likely to get a winner.

Harry Kane endured a disappointing evening and was substituted well before the finish
Harry Kane endured a disappointing evening and was substituted well before the finish

In the end, England were relieved to escape with a point.

Here are the talking points from Wembley.

1. Battle of Britain

England's Kalvin Phillips puts a strong tackle in on Scotland's John McGinn
England's Kalvin Phillips puts a strong tackle in on Scotland's John McGinn

This match has promised so much for so long, and it duly delivered.

We asked for a contest, we got a battle.

England came into the fixture as big favourites over their rivals but were met with a rude awakening and put to the task.

You could tell Scotland were up for it from the first whistle as Lyndon Dykes immediately clattered into Luke Shaw, which quickly set the tone for their aggressive pressing and rough-and-ready approach.

John McGinn was snapping away at the ankles of England's stars, Scott McTominay too, and even though Wembley was only a quarter full, the atmosphere was intense.

If the Three Lions were expected to walk all over their opponents, it soon became anything but, as they struggled to find any rhythm and had their own heart-in-mouth moments at their own end.

When Pickford was called into action - palming O'Donnell's volley away with a strong save - you sensed the visitors might just get something, and their eventual point was just rewards for their efforts.

2. Stone the crows!

John Stones' header hits the woodwork following Mason Mount's corner
John Stones' header hits the woodwork following Mason Mount's corner

As much as England struggled to find a way past Scotland, they could have been in front as early as the 11th minute.

The answer to why they weren't is really only something John Stones can answer, as his leaping header cannoned back off the upright when he had been left completely unmarked

Mason Mount's corner was drifting higher than the centre-back would have liked, but it's the sort of chance Stones should be burying.

England's threat from set pieces is something that will no doubt come in handy throughout the tournament - but they simply cannot let opportunities like this one go begging.

3. Lions lack killer instinct

Jack Grealish came off the bench but struggled to get into the game
Jack Grealish came off the bench but struggled to get into the game

With every game that passes the clamour for Jack Grealish only grows louder.

And it's hard not to see why, as England again struggled to piece together threatening moves in the final third.

Phil Foden was lively and was England's driving force, while Raheem Sterling's link-up play was good at times, but Kane was too often left isolated.

Too many times England's players were left looking for passes to teammates and ended up running down dead ends that they needed someone between them to knit things together.

Balls over the top were hopeful, rather than purposeful, and England's failure to really cut open Scotland for much of the match is a concern.

Scotland defended well but they were hardly backs to the wall. Grealish then entered the fray with half an hour to go but was shunted into a wide role and barely saw the ball for long spells.

It's all very well having balance, but there's something to be said for building a team round your best players.

Mount is creative, technically brilliant and a true box-to-box midfielder, but he is better from deep and lacks the cunning to be a true No.10 through the middle.

Surely Grealish is the answer.

4. Full-back rotation

Luke Shaw was selected at left-back in place of Kieran Trippier
Luke Shaw was selected at left-back in place of Kieran Trippier

Much was made about Gareth Southgate's fondness for a full-back prior to the tournament started, and he is already utilising the five he has at his disposal.

Out went Kieran Trippier and Kyle Walker after the win over Croatia, in came Luke Shaw and Reece James, as Southgate explained the pair's "technical ability with the ball" was the reason behind the switch.

James certainly possesses a great attacking threat, as his pinpoint cross for Kane in the first half proved, and he wasn't far off with a shot of his own later on. He is the closest England have to another Trent Alexander-Arnold.

And it was only thanks to his quick-thinking that England didn't fall behind as he headed superbly off the line.

But making an impact in the final third was always going to be difficult against Scotland's wing-back system, and neither Shaw nor James truly staked a definitive claim to be a regular starter.

Who Southgate picks in the next match is now anyone's guess.

5. Kane left frustrated

England's Harry Kane under close pressure from Scotland's Grant Hanley
England's Harry Kane under close pressure from Scotland's Grant Hanley

If England are to go all the way in this tournament they need their talisman firing - but it's just not happening at the moment for Harry Kane.

He looked off the pace, struggled with his hold up play, and generally offered little in the final third to cause Scotland any problems.

If anything, it was Scotland's Che Adams who was the most impressive striker on the field.

England need Kane in the box but far too often he is dropping deep into the gaps to try and feed a teammate in rather than have a chance at goal himself.

When Grealish was being readied it offered plenty of promise, but taking off Foden was not a positive switch as, until that point, he had arguably been England's brightest player.

Same cannot be said for Kane, who for two games in a row hasn't delivered, with Southgate resorting to subbing him with more than a quarter of an hour still to play.

Not the kind of form you want from your main man.